Abduction: The Megumi Yokota Story
Abduction: The Megumi Yokota Story (2006)

The inexplicable disappearance of a 13-year-old Japanese girl prompts a 20-year international investigation that eventually leads to North Korea in directors Chris Sheridan and Patty Kim's harrowing tale of a most unusual abduction. It… More

Rated: Unrated
Running Time:
Release Date: November 24, 2006
Add Your Rating
Rotten Tomatoes™
Critic Score
83%
Flixster
User Score
85%


Critic Score: 83% Rotten Tomatoes™ Critic Reviews
Sid Smith
Chicago Tribune

This superb, quite moving film combines interviews, news footage and some reality TV-like sequences and works on a number of levels.

Full review…
Frank Scheck
Hollywood Reporter

There's no denying the fascinating nature of the story, about a 13-year-old Japanese girl whose mysterious 1977 disappearance was ultimately credited to nothing less than a kidnapping by North Korean spies.

Michael W. Phillips, Jr.
Goatdog's Movies

This topic deserved better than America's Most Wanted.

Full review…
Scott Brown
Entertainment Weekly

... as thickets of history and culture are (too) neatly avoided, the viewer is also left in the dark.

Full review…
V.A. Musetto
New York Post

Abduction uses interviews, vintage photos and re-creations to tell the sad story of love and hope in riveting, suspenseful style. So powerful is this film, it brought tears to my eyes.

Full review…
Marc Mohan
Oregonian

Abduction is a skillful interweaving of emotional, personal stories with the thicker strands of history, and a reminder that in reality such tales rarely have a tidy end.

Full review…
Anthony Lane
New Yorker

The events that unfold in the new documentary Abduction: The Megumi Yokota Story could have been told as fiction, but they would have seemed too much -- too unbelievable, too merciless.

Jack Mathews
New York Daily News

Canadians Chris Sheridan and Patty Kim's spellbinding documentary focuses on the relentless search for the truth by Megumi's parents and families of other abductees.

Full review…
Timothy Knight
Reel.com

Incredibly powerful -- and never more so than when the filmmakers turn their cameras on the Yokotas and other victims' families, many of whom channel their pain and anger into political activism.