Amistad
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In the summer of 1839, on a stormy night off the coast of Cuba, 53 Africans held captive in the cramped cargo holds of the Spanish slave ship La Amistad break free of their shackles. Led by Cinque, they arm themselves, take control of the ship and reclaim their freedom. They have one goal: to return to Africa. Without the navigational skills to guide them home, the Africans are forced to rely on the two surviving members of the crew. But they are tricked. After two months on a ragged course up the Eastern seaboard, the Amistad is captured by an American naval ship off the coast of Connecticut… More
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 76%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"In Amistad, an admirable but disappointing effort...[Speilberg] veers between stoic political correctness and mushy Hollywood platitudes."
‑ Edward Guthmann, San Francisco Chronicle
"Halfway into Amistad comes the point where Steven Spielberg pulls the lever, and the stink and horror and bestialities of slavery spill around our ankles. We can't look away."
‑ Jeff Millar, Houston Chronicle
"Aiming to instruct and entertain, and often struggling to reconcile these goals, Amistad lacks the subtlety of tone and simplicity of form that made Schindler's List one of Spielberg's very best; here, however, every idea and image are too explicit."
‑ Emanuel Levy, EmanuelLevy.Com
"This is the most straightforward, understated, and powerful big-screen representation of the gospel in recent movie history. And for that, Amistad should be recommended to everyone."
‑ Jeffrey Overstreet, Looking Closer
"Just when you thought you had seen the best movie there is about a historic seagoing vessel, along comes Amistad."
‑ John R. McEwen, Film Quips Online
"Spielberg seems to be dividing his filmmaking output into two distinct halves: in the summer months cranking out no-brainer dinosaur flicks...in the winter season unveiling his serious artistic stuff to edify the adults and woo the Oscar crowd."
‑ Rick Groen, Globe and Mail
"Powerful story for mid-teens and up."
‑ Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
"Fortunately, the dry, courtroom banter is interjected with powerful accounts of the violent, inhumane atrocities inflicted on the slaves by Spanish merchants."
‑ Tom Meek, Film Threat
"As with Schindler’s List, Spielberg allows his subjects to be remote and somewhat unknowable human beings, creating an air of documentary-like authenticity."
‑ Steven D. Greydanus, Decent Films Guide
"Spielberg's films never lack a certain degree of narrative and visual force, but his tendency toward sentimentality, a strictly antipodal, Good-vs.-Bad conception of character, and an insensitivity to structure have consistently marred his work..."
‑ Nick Davis, Nick's Flick Picks
"What is most valuable about Amistad is the way it provides faces and names for its African characters, whom the movies so often make into faceless victims."
‑ Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times
"Amistad is worth seeing just for people to know about this important story, this moment in history. But from the world's most powerful, successful and famous director, we expect more."
‑ Jeffrey M. Anderson, Combustible Celluloid
"Amistad is the telling of an interesting event in American history, but doesn't draw its audience in to the heart of the story."
‑ Robin Clifford, Reeling Reviews
"Amistad is the kind of movie that makes a tired topic seem fresh and entertaining again."
‑ Eugene Novikov, Film Blather
"Steven Spielberg's engaging, heartfelt and well-made drama delves into a critical incident in the history of slavery in America."
‑ Margaret A. McGurk, Cincinnati Enquirer
More reviews for Amistad on Rotten Tomatoes

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