An Alan Smithee Film: Burn, Hollywood, Burn
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An Alan Smithee Film: Burn, Hollywood, Burn
First, a little background: in 1955, the Director's Guild of America created the pseudonym Alan Smithee, which film directors are allowed to use if they feel their work has been tampered with to such a degree that they no longer want the credit. (For example, if you look at the credits of the expanded and heavily narrated TV version of Dune, you'll notice the director is not listed as David Lynch, but as Alan Smithee.) An Alan Smithee Film: Burn Hollywood Burn is a comedy about a film editor (played by Eric Idle) who finally gets his big break -- he's given the opportunity to… More

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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 8%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"The level of humor could be called sophomoric, but that would insult most sophomores."
‑ John Hartl, Seattle Times
"A caustic but under-funny "expose" of the venality of the motion picture business."
‑ Todd McCarthy, Variety
"A crude, vulgar satire of Hollywood shallowness, insincerity and moral bankruptcy."
‑ Maitland McDonagh, TV Guide's Movie Guide
"Skip it."
‑ Dragan Antulov, rec.arts.movies.reviews
"A very peculiar, abrasive comedy, but not without its merits."
‑ Jeffrey M. Anderson, San Francisco Examiner
"A comedy without laughs, an expose without point."
‑ Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune
"If you harbor an interest in watching so-called "industry smarts" autodestruct, this carries a certain morbid appeal, but that's about the extent of it."
‑ Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader
"Not even Stallone and Jackie Chan can save it.."
‑ Clint Morris, Moviehole
"A desperate and disjointed farce that flops considerably. This satirical sabotage on the moviemaking industry is an incoherent and unfunny abomination"
‑ Frank Ochieng, Movie Eye
"Decent idea, extremely lousy execution. More talent has not gone to waste in a long time."
‑ Luke Y. Thompson, New Times
"What turns the witlessness rancid is the way the movie is saturated in the very corruption it thinks it's ridiculing."
‑ Owen Gleiberman, Entertainment Weekly
"Burning is too good for such a wretched fiasco; only a surgical nuclear strike could suitably destroy what has to be one of the most enervating comedies ever made."
‑ Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times
"It's unafraid of the consequences of its existence, and it's brutally nasty , offensive, and abrasive. In other words, the kind of comedy they used to make in the 70's before things became politically correct."
‑ Jeffrey M. Anderson, Combustible Celluloid
"This jab at Hollywood seems close in subject matter to another title credited to Alan Smithee, Bloodsucking Pharaohs in Pittsburgh."
‑ Susan Tavernetti, Palo Alto Weekly
"a film more noteworthy for its title's lack of commas than for any other asset"
‑ Brandon Judell, Critics Inc./America Online
More reviews for An Alan Smithee Film: Burn, Hollywood, Burn on Rotten Tomatoes