Beauties of the Night
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Director René Clair insisted that his 1952 production Beauties of the Night (Les Belles du Nuit) was intended as a comic variation on Griffith's multipart Intolerance (1916). The Clair film deals with a disillusioned music teacher (Gérard Philipe) who dreams of the beautiful women of history, envisioning himself as the central male figure in each dream. The imaginary ladies (including such internationally famous lovelies as Martine Carol and Gina Lollobrigida) begin converging on the hero all at once, much to the delight of both Philipe and the audience. At several junctures, Clair revives… More
Rotten Tomatoes Score: 100%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"It is eminently pleasing to this old film hand to discover that Rene Clair still has an amiable feeling -- and a talent -- for the craft of cinema."
‑ Bosley Crowther, New York Times
"Ceaselessly inventive."
‑ , Film4
"[An] engaging fantasy."
‑ Tom Milne, Time Out
"With such a bizarre premise it would seem that the film could easily get out of hand. Yet, with a master such as Clair at the helm, the plot development remains under control, offering some delightful insights."
‑ , TV Guide's Movie Guide
More reviews for Beauties of the Night on Rotten Tomatoes