Bicentennial Man
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If a robot spends enough time around humans, can he learn to become one of them? The Martin family purchases a domestic android as a servant and names him Andrew (Robin Williams). Andrew comes to know the man of the house as Sir (Sam Neill), his wife as Ma'am Wendy Crewson, and their daughter as Portia (Embeth Davidtz); before long, the Martins suspect that they do not have an ordinary robot on their hands. Andrew seems capable of expressing emotion and generating original thoughts, and the longer he stays with the Martins, the more strongly these human traits manifest themselves. Over the… More

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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 37%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Columbus lays on the sentimentality thickly, sometimes letting it get in the way of the storytelling. The longer the movie continues, the more overt he becomes in his emotional pandering."
‑ Jeff Strickler, Minneapolis Star Tribune
"This tin man has a heart, but his movie needs a pulse."
‑ Steve Murray, Atlanta Journal-Constitution
"Film about robot who wants to be human is so-so."
‑ Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
"The film swiftly settles into an unevenly paced, episodic structure, unsure whether it's a family saga, a sci-fi drama or a children's comedy."
‑ Mike Higgins, Sight and Sound
"Becomes a somber, sentimental and rather profound romantic fantasy that is more true to the spirit of the Golden Age of science-fiction writing than possibly any other movie of the '90s."
‑ William Arnold, Seattle Post-Intelligencer
"It's one thing to ask an audience to love a mechanical man, but quite another to love a mechanical performance."
‑ Liam Lacey, Globe and Mail
"A cornball drone of greeting-card sentiment."
‑ Roger Ebert, At the Movies
"...aspires to an almost adult level of seriousness."
‑ Philip Martin, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
"Virtually every emotion, motivation, idea, character and plot point in the movie is flat and perfunctory -- except for those that carry the invisible subtitle, 'Cry, dammit!'"
‑ Margaret A. McGurk, Cincinnati Enquirer
"Best left on the shelf to collect dust."
‑ Chuck Rudolph, Matinee Magazine
"Bicentennial Man has heart, but lacks bite."
‑ Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune
"An ambitious tale handled in a dawdling, sentimental way."
‑ Todd McCarthy, Variety
"Bicentennial Man is sometimes sweet, but it's also a phenomenal waste of talent, and a continuation of a Williams' trip down the wrong road."
‑ Jeffrey M. Anderson, Combustible Celluloid
"You long for [Williams] to break the metal mold, if only for a minute, to remind you that you are watching the best improvisational comedian of this millennium."
‑ Mike Kerrigan, Boxoffice Magazine
"A shiny houehold robot becomes an exemplar of the spiritual practice of kindness in this film that must be taken to heart."
‑ Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat, Spirituality and Practice
More reviews for Bicentennial Man on Rotten Tomatoes

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