Black Moon
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In Louis Malle's apocalyptic fantasy Black Moon, Lily (Cathryn Harrison, granddaughter of Rex) drives down a lonesome road, and soon finds herself in a alternate world full of non sequiturs and bizarre characters. At times, this looks like a David Lynch film, what with an old woman conversing with a rat, a pack of naked children chasing a pig, a talking unicorn, a strange set of possibly incestuous siblings (one of whom is "underground" film star Joe Dallesandro), and several other warped set pieces. Malle reportedly culled inspiration for the narrative of this film from his own… More
Rotten Tomatoes Score: 44%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"There is an order to this film, but we must supply it, each according to his needs."
‑ Vincent Canby, New York Times
"its outlandish and nonsensical detours begin to feel less like the "automatic writing" of the surrealists and more like a series of meandering, meaningless head games, each melting into the next with no lasting impact."
‑ James Kendrick, Q Network Film Desk
"Naturally such a radical and opaque film, like none ever done before or since, was a commercial flop because the general public didn't know what to make of it."
‑ Dennis Schwartz, Ozus' World Movie Reviews
"Fans for such a film need insight more than sundry freakout moments."
‑ Matthew Sorrento, IdentityTheory
"Is there a single film that combines genocide, a talking unicorn, and breast feeding?... Yes!"
‑ Christopher Long, Movie Metropolis
"A curiosity on the margins of the Malle canon, and a real treat for fans of the phantasmagorical."
‑ Anton Bitel, Film4
"Some critics described Black Moon as a sort of darker Alice in Wonderland, but it's much too tedious to approach that level of entertainment."
‑ Eric Melin, Scene-Stealers.com
"Instinctual ferocity all but eludes Malle, who can only tastefully arrange his shots to appear to rise from the subconscious"
‑ Fernando F. Croce, CinePassion
More reviews for Black Moon on Rotten Tomatoes