Chocolat
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The most tempting of all sweets becomes the key weapon in a battle of sensual pleasure versus disciplined self-denial in this comedy. In 1959, a mysterious woman named Vianne (Juliette Binoche) moves with her young daughter into a small French village, where much of the community's activities are dominated by the local Catholic church. A few days after settling into town, Vianne opens up a confectionery shop across the street from the house of worship -- shortly after the beginning of Lent. While the townspeople are supposed to be abstaining from worldly pleasures, Vianne tempts them with… More

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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 63%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Ultimately, especially coming from director Lasse Hallstrom, such a slight flick doubles as a fat disappointment."
‑ Rick Groen, Globe and Mail
"One of those whimsical concoctions that tries too hard, and goes too long, for its own good."
‑ Steven Rea, Philadelphia Inquirer
"Hallström should refrain from preachy parables and move on to an entrée"
‑ John A. Nesbit, Old School Reviews
"A mythic fable about tolerance and love with the bitter-swet flavor of a candy that's not entirely fresh but still digestible."
‑ Emanuel Levy, EmanuelLevy.Com
"Whether or not viewers end up licking their fingers to pick up the scraps ... depends on their tolerance for a different type of sugary sin: syrup."
‑ Michael Dequina, TheMovieReport.com
"A sinfully scrumptious bonbon."
‑ Peter Travers, Rolling Stone
"Chocolat, like Hallstrom's adaptation of The Cider House Rules, succeeds primarily through its casting."
‑ Terry Lawson, Detroit Free Press
"Fabulous French fairy tale and romance for teens and up."
‑ Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
"Most movies that criticize religion argue for the abolition of institutions. Chocolat suggests the problem lies in how people manipulate religion to get what they want."
‑ Jeffrey Overstreet, Looking Closer
"A charming film with serious undertones."
‑ Jean Lowerison, San Diego Metropolitan
"Watching Chocolat is like binging on a bottomless box of truffles: Tastes good and sweet at first, but after a while, you start feeling a little green."
‑ Rene Rodriguez, Miami Herald
"An appealing comic fable aimed at those with a bittersweet tooth."
‑ Rita Kempley, Washington Post
"It takes the radical stance that people should indulge their pleasures, unless they're really mean, in which case they should eat some chocolate and learn to be nice."
‑ Rob Gonsalves, eFilmCritic.com
"I've not had a film make me crave chockies so much since Willy Wonka."
‑ John R. McEwen, Film Quips Online
"Any movie built on the premise that chocolate can cure mental illness, restore marital passion, unite feuding relatives, assuage anger, defeat oppression, inspire art and get you a date with Johnny Depp is all right in my book."
‑ Margaret A. McGurk, Cincinnati Enquirer
More reviews for Chocolat on Rotten Tomatoes

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