Cluny Brown
Cluny Brown (1946)

In this film, set just prior to WWII, lovely Cluny Brown is the niece of a London plumber; when her uncle is indisposed, Cluny rolls up her sleeves and takes a plumbing job at a society home, where she meets a handsome refugee Czech author.

Directed By:
Rated: Unrated
Running Time:
Release Date: May 1, 1946
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Rotten Tomatoes™
Critic Score
91%
Flixster
User Score
78%


Critic Score: 91% Rotten Tomatoes™ Critic Reviews
Richard Brody
New Yorker

Ernst Lubitsch's last completed film, from 1946, looks back to the prewar year of 1938 to take stock of the postwar world and to show how it got that way.

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Variety Staff
Variety

Whammo entertainment.

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Total Film

Sprightly enough, but scores nothing like the wit and verve of Ninotchka or To Be Or Not To Be.

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Tom Milne
Time Out

Lubitsch's last film and one of his most engaging comedies.

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Jonathan Rosenbaum
Chicago Reader

This late, delicious comedy of manners by Ernst Lubitsch is a notch below his best, but the character acting is so good one hardly notices.

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Robin Karney
Radio Times

This somewhat outmoded satirical soufflé on British upper-class mores is nonetheless diverting.

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A.H. Weiler
New York Times

Let is be noted at the outset that Ernst Lubitsch has come up with a delectable and sprightly lampoon in Cluny Brown.

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Film4

Sadly, the comedy his last proper film (That Lady in Ermine was completed by Preminger), hardly bites, but it certainly barks.

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TV Guide's Movie Guide

The last film with the fabled "Lubitsch touch" contains moments of satire that raise it to classic status, as Lubitsch, Hoffenstein and Reinhardt take shots at upper-class England with deadly aim.

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More reviews for Cluny Brown

Flixster Audience Score: 78% Flixster User Reviews
Stella Dallas
i only wish jennifer jones had done more comedy! she was absolutely delightful here! with the ever charming charles boyer, lubitsch's last film is well… More
Ken Stachnik
Totally phoned in Lubitsch. I'm not sure what went wrong here, I'm sure the play its clearly based on is good, but I was just bored to tears.