Der Unhold (The Ogre)
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Based on a novel by French author Michel Tournier, this drama chronicles the redemption of Abel, a French POW responsible for kidnapping dozens of young boys for recruitment by the Nazi SS during WW II. The film opens with black-and-white shots of Abel's childhood in Paris. The year is 1925 and already he has problems getting along with teachers and students. Then he is befriended by the portly young Nestor. Abel loses his only friend during a terrible fire that demolishes the school and leaves him convinced that he has been blessed by fate to survive. Fourteen years quickly pass; the… More
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 89%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Schlöndorff and Jean-Claude Carrière find in Michel Tournier's novel a companion piece to their earlier Günter Grass adaptation, The Tin Drum."
‑ Geoff Andrew, Time Out
"Haunting as the film is, it never feels quite cohesive."
‑ Ken Hanke, Mountain Xpress (Asheville, NC)
"Schlondorff has said he built the film around Malkovich, and the actor lives up to the responsibility."
‑ Walter V. Addiego, San Francisco Examiner
"Episodic and vaguely surreal, it is the antithesis of a Hollywood film that tells us what to feel. Having unfolded an ever-widening series of moral questions, it deliberately leaves them hanging."
‑ Stephen Holden, New York Times
"Astonishing, disturbing, and altogether an affecting piece of work, The Ogre is Schlondorff -- and everyone else involved -- working in top form."
‑ Marc Savlov, Austin Chronicle
"With his slightly cross- eyed gaze of wonderment mixed with ferocious intensity, Malkovich makes Abel both childlike and frightening."
‑ Peter Stack, San Francisco Chronicle
"From its awkward childhood prologue, which features painfully bad acting, to its title character, a simple-minded, large-of-stature man played by the most intellectual-seeming and average-sized of actors (John Malkovich), The Ogre is ill conceived."
‑ Melissa Morrison, Boxoffice Magazine
More reviews for Der Unhold (The Ogre) on Rotten Tomatoes