Glastonbury
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In 1970, a music aficionado and entrepreneur named Michael Eavis staged a "pop, folk, and blues" festival on a dairy farm in the English community of Glastonbury, not far from Stonehenge. 1,500 attended the "Glastonbury Fayre," and a second festival followed in 1971. By 2005, The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts had grown into the biggest pop music festival in the world, playing host to the biggest names in rock, reggae, electronic, blues, and world music for a crowd of up to 150,000 people over the course of a three-day weekend in June. Filmmaker Julien… More
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 73%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"... as muddy as Yasgur's farm back in the day."
‑ Ty Burr, Boston Globe
"A warm and witty, detailed look at this parallel universe."
‑ Joel Selvin, San Francisco Chronicle
"It's hard to pin down the intent and even the honesty of the filmmaker."
‑ Arthur Ryel-Lindsey, Slant Magazine
"The sense of total immersion is breathlessly complete."
‑ Marc Savlov, Austin Chronicle
"While the movie will clarify whether or not the fest is for you, you never feel like you're actually there."
‑ Matt Pais, Metromix.com
"For all the posers with light sticks and piercings, there are moments of Dada-esque beauty, not to mention some great music from Tinariwen, Bjork, David Bowie and the late, great Joe Strummer."
‑ Ann Hornaday, Washington Post
"The overall soundtrack seamlessly patches together a sonic quilt of eclectic music that evokes a kind of timeless flow. It's not a Glastonbury of any particular vintage, but rather a continuum of experiences that have occurred on this sacred ground."
‑ Kevin Crust, Los Angeles Times
"Combining images of 30 years of politics, music, self-expression and alternative living, it's a vibrant, if inevitably scattered, film that manages to tread the fine line between chronicling the festival and exploiting it."
‑ Shawn Levy, Oregonian
"... captures the open-air rock festival experience more completely than any previous film of its kind."
‑ Bill White, Seattle Post-Intelligencer
"The movie's 135 minutes [feels] long. But the length is a product of [director] Temple's desire to cram in as much as he can. Despite the festival's drawbacks, it's obvious Temple loves everything about it. Even Coldplay."
‑ Chris Hewitt (St. Paul), St. Paul Pioneer Press
"The portrait is spectacular and inclusive, if sometimes a bit overwhelming and confusing."
‑ Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune
"A frenetic cut-and-paste job that is free of voiceover, commentary or even titles to introduce interviewees. Such calculated vagueness works, and the lingering impression is of a messy and hedonistic free-for-all."
‑ Dave Calhoun, Time Out
"An alternately rousing and repetitive 138-minute documentary spanning four decades of the Glastonbury Festival."
‑ Duane Dudek, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
"What [Temple] does...is immerse his audience in the spirit of the festival with ingenious editing that shows the Glastonbury Festival as nothing short of a geographically bound society that just happens to exist for a few days a year."
‑ Laura Clifford, Reeling Reviews
"Overlong, unfocused, and shallow, it is less a film than a test of endurance."
‑ Pam Grady, Reel.com
More reviews for Glastonbury on Rotten Tomatoes