Historias que so existem quando lembradas (Found Memories)
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Historias que so existem quando lembradas (Found Memories)
Like every morning, Madalena makes bread for Antonio's old coffee shop. Like every day, she crosses the railways where no trains have passed for years; she cleans up the gate of the locked cemetery, and listens to the priest's sermon before sharing lunch with the other old villagers. Clinging to the image of her dead husband and living in her memories, Madalena is awakened by the arrival of Rita, a young photographer who is arriving in the ghost village of Jotuomba, where time seems to have stopped. A deep relationship is forged between the two women, which gradually builds to have a… More

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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 90%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"The drama in "Found Memories" is subdued, sometimes almost invisible, but it moves with quiet assurance toward a startling conclusion."
‑ A.O. Scott, New York Times
"Brazilian filmmaker Júlia Murat's first narrative feature is a mesmerizing, slow-build marvel."
‑ Eric Hynes, Time Out New York
"Caffeinate yourself--severely--before this one."
‑ David Noh, Film Journal International
"Julia Murat shows a fine grasp of form, letting her technique reflect the elements and moods of her story."
‑ R. Kurt Osenlund, Slant Magazine
"The feeling of twilight permeates Found Memories, which doesn't feel so much like a tale of discovery as it does a eulogy."
‑ Andrew Lapin, NPR
"A pic immersed in the passage of time."
‑ Jay Weissberg, Variety
"Ambicioso, corajoso e aponta sua diretora como um nome a ser observado de agora em diante."
‑ Pablo Villaca, Cinema em Cena
"Initially treated like the parasite she appears to be, over the course of this crisp, gracefully inflected meditation on time's passage, Rita develops the interest in her subjects that turns an image into more than stolen light."
‑ Michelle Orange, Village Voice
"If a supernatural intepretation is correct, is the village's fate melancholy or enviable? Is an eternity of old age pleasant or pointless?"
‑ John Beifuss, Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)
"A visually poetic parabolic drama about aging, death, community, hospitality, and transformation."
‑ Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat, Spirituality and Practice