Kafka
Kafka (1991)

Steve Soderbergh did a 180 degree turnaround from his debut film sex, lies, and videotape with Kafka, a stark art-film fable for literature majors. Jeremy Irons plays a fictional Franz Kafka, living in Prague in 1919. By day, Kafka works in… More

Rated: PG-13
Running Time:
Release Date: December 22, 1992
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Rotten Tomatoes™
Critic Score
57%
Flixster
User Score
74%


Critic Score: 57% Rotten Tomatoes™ Critic Reviews
Vincent Canby
New York Times

Steven Soderbergh's Kafka is a very bad well-directed movie.

Full review…
Rita Kempley
Washington Post

The effect is artistic, but it's also obvious when the material cried out for unsettling.

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Douglas Pratt
DVDLaser

the film has a shallow, sophomoric earnestness

Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times

Soderbergh does demonstrate again here that he's a gifted director, however unwise in his choice of project.

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Dennis Schwartz
Ozus' World Movie Reviews

All the Kafka basics are there for the literary types to muse over and it has great entertainment value in its unpretentious playfulness.

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Mark Robison
Reno Gazette-Journal

Incomprehensible but interesting.

Desson Thomson
Washington Post

A movie about Franz Kafka? It's a good idea for a microsecond. Then it dissolves into a dumb proposition.

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Emanuel Levy
EmanuelLevy.Com

Soderbergh's sophomore jinx, a pastiche of styles (noir, German Expressionism) and themes (personal and political oppression), further hampered by the vastly miscast Jeremy Irons.

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Ken Hanke
Mountain Xpress (Asheville, NC)

One of Soderbergh's most fascinating films.

More reviews for Kafka

Flixster Audience Score: 74% Flixster User Reviews
Steve K
Beautiful to look at but ever so slight.
Anthony Valletta
Under appreciated Soderbergh gem.
Stephen Earnest
Mysterious and stylish but incoherent and empty, "Kafka" is a good-looking disappointment for director Steven Soderbergh. Impressive camerawork and… More
Doctor Strangeblog
Moody, mysterious, and measured thriller shot in beautiful black & white except for a pivotal sequence inside "the Castle." Soderbergh's… More