Katzelmacher (1969)

Jorgos (Rainer Werner Fassbinder) is a Greek immigrant in Germany who encounters the intolerance of the locals against foreign workers. Open hostility turns to violence when he is beaten up by the authoritarian thugs after dating a German… More

Rated: R
Running Time:
Release Date: September 24, 2002
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Critic Score: 100% Rotten Tomatoes™ Critic Reviews
Vincent Canby
New York Times

I've described the style of the film in some detail because it is so hypnotic and eventually so comic.

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Noel Murray
The Dissolve

That's what Katzelmacher is: a punishment, via art, leveled at all the ignorant, egotistical racists Fassbinder had known.

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Dennis Schwartz
Ozus' World Movie Reviews

There's a blinding nasty truth about the young filmmaker's own generation that he richly exploits...

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Jonathan Rosenbaum
Chicago Reader

There's less plot than usual, but the portraiture already seems firmly in place.

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Jeffrey M. Anderson
Combustible Celluloid

Fassbinder's second film feels rarely moves, but simmers with a kind of rancid, unnamable anger.

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Scott Weinberg

Overt societal disillusionment with a healthy dose of violently expressed xenophobia. Understood.

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Christopher Long
Movie Metropolis

Shot in just over a week and provides the writer-director with a larger collection of personalities to send careening against each other.

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Matt Bailey
Not Coming to a Theater Near You

For those looking to figure out what the hell Fassbinder was all about, this is an excellent starting point.

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Christopher Null

It doesn't reach the level of despair of some of Fassbinder's other works, but the artistry is unquestionable.

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More reviews for Katzelmacher

Flixster Audience Score: 70% Flixster User Reviews
Carlos Magalhães
One of the first of Fassbinder's films, a cynical story that, even if not remarkable, was already an early indication of his talent as a filmmaker -… More
Marcus Woolcott
Fassbinder is clearly much more comfortable here as he deals with xenophobia and repression.