La Ragazza che sapeva troppo (The Girl Who Knew Too Much) (The Evil Eye)
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La Ragazza che sapeva troppo (The Girl Who Knew Too Much) (The Evil Eye)
Generally considered the first real giallo film, Mario Bava's stylish thriller stars Leticia Roman as Nora, who travels to Rome to visit her sick aunt. The aunt dies that night, and Nora ends up witnessing a murder. The police and kindly Dr. Bassi (John Saxon) don't believe her, since there is no body, so she goes to stay with her aunt's friends, the Cravens. Along the way, there are several more murders tied to a decade-long string of killings of victims chosen in alphabetical order by surname. The surprising ending is worth staying around for, as is an amusing supporting… More

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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 71%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Bava, who'd once shot films for Roberto Rossellini and Raoul Walsh, used black and white for the last time on this project, and with its mastery of the noir vocabulary it helped establish the giallo."
‑ J. R. Jones, Chicago Reader
"As expected, The Girl Who Knew Too Much has been infused with a compelling and thoroughly memorable sense of style that's ultimately revealed as the one bright spot within a film that's otherwise fairly interminable."
‑ David Nusair, Reel Film Reviews
"The giallo gets its cinematic foundation in Mario Bava's wide-eyed "story of a vacation""
‑ Fernando F. Croce, CinePassion
"It's a bit plot-heavy for Bava, but it's still beautifully filmed."
‑ Jeffrey M. Anderson, Combustible Celluloid
"Plot and coherence aren't really so important as atmosphere and style and thrills, and these things [the film] possesses in abundance."
‑ Tim Brayton, Antagony & Ecstasy
"It works as a homage to Hitchcock, but without the master's flawless power of storytelling."
‑ Dennis Schwartz, Ozus' World Movie Reviews