Metropolitan
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The debut film from writer-director Whit Stillman etches a sophisticated comic portrait of New York debutante society at the twilight of the 1980s. Set during the Christmas season, the film is told from the vantage point of Tom Townsend (Edward Clements), a self-professed proletarian radical who stumbles into the social sphere of a group of well-off Upper East Side twentysomethings calling themselves the SFRP (or Sally Fowler Rat Pack, named in honor of a frequent party hostess). The group includes Nick (Christopher Eigeman), an acidic misanthrope; sweet-natured Jane Austen acolyte Audrey… More
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 89%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Whit Stillman's crafty independent feature about wealthy Park Avenue teenagers and a middle-class boy who joins their ranks over one Christmas vacation is certainly well imagined, and impressively acted by a cast of newcomers."
‑ Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader
"True appreciation for this movie may be restricted to those with firsthand experience in this kind of world, or a certain upper-haute stamina."
‑ Desson Thomson, Washington Post
"You get the feeling that you're eavesdropping on real conversation rather than the polite chit-chat you might expect at actual events, and seeing those aristocratic tendencies fall away to reveal scared human beings is part of the movie's infinite charm."
‑ Eric Melin, Scene-Stealers.com
"A witty, urbane portrait of Manhattan's debutante scene."
‑ Matthew Leyland, BBC.com
"It's the beautifully chiselled dialogue -- counterpointed by near-static camerawork and a nicely mannered acting style -- that remains the chief attraction."
‑ Andrew Pulver, Guardian
"Filmmaker Whit Stillman makes a strikingly original debut with Metropolitan, a glib, ironic portrait of the vulnerable young heirs to Manhattan's disappearing debutante scene."
‑ Variety Staff, Variety
"Not very much happens in Metropolitan, and yet everything that happens is felt deeply, because the characters in this movie are still too young to have perfected their defenses against life."
‑ Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times
"Stillman's script is so present at every moment that it's easy to overlook how precisely the film has been directed."
‑ Tim Brayton, Antagony & Ecstasy
"As low-budget as the film looks, Stillman overcomes financial limitations by providing a learned script and eliciting polished performances."
‑ James Mottram, Film4
"Stillman's film depends on strong dialogue and language, his humor is submerged in the text and is played deadpan by his actors; no wonder some critics have compared him to the Gallic Eric Rohmer"
‑ Emanuel Levy, EmanuelLevy.Com
"None of Stillman's endearing characters quite fits their prescribed social context, and in its exhilarated final movement, Metropolitan finds an exit out of the stifling UHB salon."
‑ Jessica Winter, Time Out
"Like chamber music, Metropolitan is sprightly, intimate and all too self-aware."
‑ Rita Kempley, Washington Post
"Unusual subject matter handled with competent self-assurance."
‑ Angie Errigo, Empire Magazine
"It's wearing surprisingly well, yet is touchingly dated."
‑ Philip French, Observer [UK]
"...Stillman's vision and words last as memory, as a look back at a more innocent time, as a thought stretched luxuriously into sarcasm, some cynicism, and many simple and sublime moments."
‑ Rory L. Aronsky, Film Threat
More reviews for Metropolitan on Rotten Tomatoes