My Kid Could Paint That
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A four-year-old girl, whose paintings are compared to Kandinsky, Pollock and even Picasso, has sold $300,000 dollars worth of paintings. Is she a genius of abstract expressionism, a tiny charlatan or an exploited child whose parents have sold her out for the glare of the media and the lure of the almighty dollar?
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 94%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"New York Times senior art critic Michael Kimmelman offers sharp insights when he mentions how Marla's painting reflects not just 'innocence' and what our psyches project into them, but also 'the cynicism of the art world.'"
‑ Mark Bourne, Film.com
"The self-reflexive narrative is particularly fascinating because Marla's story is so critical to selling her art; everyone involved, the filmmaker included, has a vested interest in proving it genuine or fake."
‑ J. R. Jones, Chicago Reader
"Questions of authenticity surrounding four year old Marla Olmstead's paintings occasion filmmaker Amir Bar-Lev's insightful investigation about media frenzy and public perception, and the very nature of nonfigurative art."
‑ Jennifer Merin, About.com
"Like all good art, this raises difficult questions."
‑ Anton Bitel, Eye for Film
"The paintings become colourfully self-deluded distortions of a world where adults project themselves back into childhood, capitalizing on both the adult nostalgia for innocence and our fascination with children who seem somehow adult."
‑ Brian Gibson, Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
"My Kid Could Paint That is documentary gold, and you will have formed an opinion on the controversy by the time you leave the theater. You may not know art, but you'll know what you like."
‑ Connie Ogle, Miami Herald
"It's a thought-provoking look at the world of abstract art, the relationship between a reporter and his/her subject, and the nature of parenting, prodigies, and "objective" storytelling."
‑ Steven Rea, Philadelphia Inquirer
"One of art's richest rewards is its way of teaching us about our assumptions, doubts, and capacity for faith. ... My Kid Could Paint That gets people thinking and talking."
‑ Jeffrey Overstreet, Looking Closer
"Mais interessante do que a provável fraude envolvendo a encantadora Marla é a reveladora sombra que o documentário projeta sobre o universo da arte moderna."
‑ Pablo Villaca, Cinema em Cena
"A fascinating exploration of art, creativity, and family dynamics that takes an unexpected right hook."
‑ Amy Nicholson, I.E. Weekly
"More than a standard child prodigy profile, My Kid Could Paint That turns into a priceless examination of modern art, celebrity and what it means to be a kid."
‑ John Monaghan, Detroit Free Press
"Documentarian Amir Bar-Lev began making a film about whether Modern art is a scam and whether a 4-year-old painter from Binghampton, N.Y., might not be as good as Picasso. But Bar-Lev ended making a film instead about whether the 4-year-old is a scam."
‑ Richard Nilsen, Arizona Republic
"Marla's story is a sobering illustration of the way children can be exploited by adults who should know better %u2013 journalists, filmmakers and especially their own parents."
‑ Rossiter Drake, San Francisco Examiner
"...an awfully slight yet basically agreeable documentary..."
‑ David Nusair, Reel Film Reviews
"Documentary filmmaker Amir Bar-Lev's "My Kid Could Paint That" is an impressive feat in that it revels in its own ambiguity while still giving us a very entertaining, ripped-from-the-headlines mystery story."
‑ Rob Thomas, Capital Times (Madison, WI)
More reviews for My Kid Could Paint That on Rotten Tomatoes

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