Noriko no shokutaku (Noriko's Dinner Table)
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Noriko no shokutaku (Noriko's Dinner Table)
Noriko's Dinner Table (2005) constitutes a follow-up with thematic similarities and loose narrative connections (though not a direct sequel) to Japanese filmmaker Shion Sono's dark 2002 satire Suicide Club. The time-fractured narrative weaves the gothic tale of the two backward Shimbara sisters, teenagers Yuka (Yuriko Yoshitaka) and Noriko (Kazue Fukiishi). The girls inadvertently become enslaved to a website, Hayiko.com, that represents a front for a perverse theatrical group, "The Family Circle" -- whereby young girls are hired by clients to act out bizarre fantasies. As a… More
Rotten Tomatoes Score: 67%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Noriko's Dinner Table embraces [suicidal] tendencies with gusto and striking originality. The film is a boldly fragmented and tantalizing saga."
‑ Kevin Thomas, Los Angeles Times
"Too long by half."
‑ Leslie Felperin, Variety
"part investigative mystery, part cultist drama, and you can pretty much guess where it's all going"
‑ Norm Schrager, Filmcritic.com
"The film is riveting at every moment even when the audience is a little unclear on how those moments connect."
‑ Jim Hemphill, Reel.com
"Noriko's Dinner Table is both prequel and sequel to Suicide Club -- but never its equal. It's twice as long and three times as ponderous."
‑ James C. Taylor, L.A. Weekly
"One of the most ambitious tonal mash-ups in memory, Noriko's Dinner Table is a domestic comedy, a bloody psychological thriller and a comment on the fragility of identity."
‑ Matt Zoller Seitz, New York Times
"There is some excessive gore near the end, but, still, this is one of the best films I've seen this year."
‑ Andy Klein, Los Angeles CityBeat
"At nearly three hours, the film may feel overlong, but it's continually surprising even when its meanings grow obscure."
‑ Ken Fox, TV Guide's Movie Guide
"Although certain aspects of [director] Sono's opus may get lost in translation, you don't need to know Japanese to understand the pitfalls of contemporary communication."
‑ Raven Snook, Time Out New York
"Has a mind-blowing scene at its climax that takes the whole movie to set up"
‑ Marty Mapes, Movie Habit
"Growing up has never felt so god-awful tedious."
‑ Jay Antani, Boxoffice Magazine
More reviews for Noriko no shokutaku (Noriko's Dinner Table) on Rotten Tomatoes