Omagh
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A devastated father struggles to find answers after a bomb detonated in the peaceful Irish town of Omagh claims the life of his twenty-one year-old son in this topical docudrama from writer/producer Paul Greengrass and director Pete Travis. In 1988 a group who referred to themselves as the "Real IRA" set a bomb that took the lives of thirty-one people in the Northern Ireland town of Omaga. In the aftermath of the explosion, soft-spoken mechanic Michael Gallagher (Gerard McSorley) was forever changed by the loss of his twenty-one year-old son. Determined not to let the same grim fate… More
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 88%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Serves as a companion piece to writer-producer Paul Greengrass' superb 2001 pic Bloody Sunday, but emerges as a startlingly powerful achievement in its own right."
‑ Scott Foundas, Variety
""Omagh" is an example of how cinematic drama must be made today in order to be effective and relevant: with honesty and heart. Brilliant."
‑ Angela Baldassarre, Sympatico.ca
"As propaganda on behalf of the Omagh victims the film does its work well, but in the end both the personal story and the collective one seem unsatisfactory."
‑ Urban Cinefile Critics, Urban Cinefile
"... unnervingly evokes both the panic and the confusion of a world suddenly ripped inside out."
‑ Geoff Pevere, Toronto Star
"... an important film."
‑ Bruce Kirkland, Jam! Movies
"Omagh might have been conceived for television, it nevertheless offers a provocative and well-produced night out at the cinema."
‑ Boyd van Hoeij, european-films.net
"... a good picture that's at its best when dramatizing the very violence it condemns."
‑ Rick Groen, Globe and Mail
"Paul Greengrass, who previous wrote and directed Bloody Sunday, co-wrote this, and once again he shines a light on the victims of the region's seemingly endless strife."
‑ Pam Grady, Reel.com
More reviews for Omagh on Rotten Tomatoes