Quatre nuits d'un rÍveur (Four Nights of a Dreamer)
Quatre nuits d'un rÍveur (Four Nights of a Dreamer) (1972)

Four Nights of a Dreamer is a loose adaptation of Dostoyevsky's novella White Nights, with the action transposed from 19th century Russia to modern-day France. One night, Jacques (Guillaume Des Forets), a young man with artistic… More

Directed By:
Rated: Unrated
Running Time:
Release Date: November 22, 1972
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Rotten Tomatoes™
Critic Score
100%
Flixster
User Score
81%


Critic Score: 100% Rotten Tomatoes™ Critic Reviews
Doug Cummings
L.A. Weekly

It's an affectionate tribute to the beauty of Parisian youth with a keen eye for the friction caused when whimsical idealism meets the messy demands of interpersonal reality.

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Dave Kehr
Chicago Reader

In the secular turn Bresson reveals an unexpected sense of humor and worldly irony.

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TV Guide's Movie Guide

This fascinating feature by master director Bresson adapts Dostoyevsky's story White Nights and puts it in Paris in the modern age.

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Roger Greenspun
New York Times

Time and again, it is shockingly beautiful, and I can think of nothing in recent films so ravishing as his strange romantic vision of the city, the river, the softly lighted tourist boats in the night.

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Tim Brayton
Antagony & Ecstasy

Gone is the blistering, fatalistic Catholicism for which Bresson is famous, to be replaced with an unusual sort of humanism that is cynical but quirky, detached but sincere.

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Dennis Schwartz
Ozus' World Movie Reviews

Bresson is at his cynical best.

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Time Out

The film is rescued from occasional moments of pretension by the gentle eroticism and absolute conviction with which it is made.

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Fernando F. Croce
CinePassion

Dostoevsky wrote it, Visconti embraced the romanticism, Robert Bresson makes it a sardonic beating around the bush

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Flixster Audience Score: 81% Flixster User Reviews
Arash Xak
Bresson's overlooked adaptation of Dostoyevsky's White Nights, A bit more accessible than his other works that I've seen, Has some interesting… More