Smother
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When an everyday thirtysomething is fired from his job, his unemployment woes are soon compounded as the ticking of his wife's maternal clock reaches a deafening pitch, and his overbearing mother announces plans to move in with the struggling couple. Dax Shepard, Liv Tyler, and Diane Keaton star in a film directed by Vince Di Meglio, co-scripted by Di Meglio and Tim Rasmussen, and produced by Rasmussen, Bill Johnson, and Jay Roach. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 38%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Smother feels like the sort of misbegotten curiosity Comedy Central uses to fill its Sunday afternoon programming."
‑ Tim Grierson, L.A. Weekly
"Not exactly unequivocal accolades for the mom in your life, nor is it Mommie Dearest packing closet hangers. But there's a decided appreciation for the woman who raised you, warts and all, and debriefing of an assortment of lingering childhood grudges."
‑ Prairie Miller, NewsBlaze
"Director and co-screenwriter Vince di Meglio handles this thin material without much subtlety."
‑ David Stratton, At the Movies (Australia)
"suffers from a distinct 'been there, done that' feeling to it"
‑ Kevin Carr, 7M Pictures
"Perhaps Diane Keaton was poisoned by merciless Asian gangsters with strict instructions to make two career-denting comedies that methodically peel away her integrity before she was allowed the sweet kiss of a life-saving antidote."
‑ Brian Orndorf, BrianOrndorf.com
"Filled with crazy situations, this comedy of errors may not work 100% of the time, but there are enough laughs to allow us to delight in its lunacy, and enough home truths about families and mother/son relationships, to be touched."
‑ Urban Cinefile Critics, Urban Cinefile
"doomed from conception"
‑ Jason McKiernan, Filmcritic.com
"This film has its share of crass, unlikely jokes, but also allows its characters some psychological complexity."
‑ Jake Wilson, The Age (Australia)
More reviews for Smother on Rotten Tomatoes