Take the Money and Run
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Take the Money and Run
When Woody Allen's fans refer to his "earlier, funnier" pictures, they often cite his directorial debut as a shining example. Co-written by Allen and Mickey Rose, this side-splitting takeoff of crime documentaries stars Allen as Virgil Starkwell, a sweetly inept career criminal. The film's most celebrated sequence involves Virgil's inability to write coherent holdup notes ("I have a gub"), but others include Virgil's losing battle with a recalcitrant coke machine and his misguided effort to emulate John Dillinger by carving a gun out of a bar of soap (his… More
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 90%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Whatever its genesis, Allen's scraggly rhetoric evolved into the dominant comic style of the 70s."
‑ Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader
"Allen has made a movie that is, in effect, a feature-length, two-reel comedy -- something very special and eccentric and funny."
‑ Vincent Canby, New York Times
"A work of despairing acuity dressed up as a skittering gagfest."
‑ Fernando F. Croce, CinePassion
"Sight gags and one-liners abound in this funny Woody Allen comedy, one of his earliest."
‑ Steve Crum, Video-Reviewmaster.com
"A few good laughs in an 85-minute film do not a comedy make."
‑ Variety Staff, Variety
"Woody Allen's Take the Money and Run has some very funny moments, and you'll laugh a lot, but in the last analysis it isn't a very funny movie."
‑ Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times
"Woody Allen's first directorial achievement is a frequently hilarious, sometimes misfiring satire of crime movies."
‑ , TV Guide's Movie Guide
"Not really good, but interesting early Allen."
‑ Ken Hanke, Mountain Xpress (Asheville, NC)
"It has plenty of hilarious jokes and concepts, like the ventriloquists' dummies at prison visiting time, and the return home from a chaingang break with five shackled cons in tow."
‑ , Time Out
"Rosenblum even suggested the use of New Orleans jazz on the soundtrack, which became a staple of future Allen projects."
‑ David Parkinson, Empire Magazine
"This good natured, episodic spoof of gangster movies was Woody Allen's first film as a director."
‑ Emanuel Levy, EmanuelLevy.Com
"The plot is just a thin excuse on which to hang Allen's nonstop visual and verbal antics."
‑ John J. Puccio, Movie Metropolis
More reviews for Take the Money and Run on Rotten Tomatoes

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