The Brass Teapot
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The Brass Teapot is a modern fable about money and the meaning of the American dream. Based on the comic book, The Brass Teapot is a feature film about John (Michael Angarano) and Alice (Juno Temple), who live in small down America. They are in their 20's, married, very much in love and broke. Once voted "Most Likely to Succeed," Alice struggles to make ends meet while her friends enjoy the good life. Her husband John, neurotic and riddled with phobias, just wants to get the bills paid. But an accident leads them to a roadside antique shop where Alice is spontaneously drawn to a… More
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 26%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Temple and Angarano, entertaining enough, never quite sell the idea that this goodhearted couple would be so easily transformed by greed."
‑ Sara Stewart, New York Post
"The Brass Teapot too often devolves into stale slapstick ..."
‑ Stephanie Zacharek, NPR
"This oddball dark comedy might have made an amusing short film, but its one-note concept wears thin at feature length."
‑ Todd Jorgenson, Cinemalogue.com
"Wish-fulfillment black comedy engages through its winsome (if violent) premise and highly attractive leads, but shows some strain towards the end."
‑ David Noh, Film Journal International
"If you happened upon "The Brass Teapot" on TV and it broke for a commercial, you'd probably change the channel."
‑ Marshall Fine, Hollywood & Fine
"Without a human dimension to ground its construct, "The Brass Teapot" ultimately feels like an interminably stretched-out skit rather than a storybook lesson stained with blood and hurt."
‑ Robert Abele, Los Angeles Times
"There's not much depth to Mosley's debut, which is based on a short story by Tim Macy. But Michael Angarano and Juno Temple are an appealing pair as John and Alice, struggling suburbanites."
‑ Elizabeth Weitzman, New York Daily News
"The screenplay falters, introducing ridiculous villains and featuring thorough lapses in logic in a blur of strained drama."
‑ Robert Levin, amNewYork
"The story is set up and unfolds in a very subtle, nuanced manner that enriches each reveal."
‑ Leland Montgomery, Paste Magazine
"Imbued with a buoyant mysticism, the film is more gag-friendly than idea-based, primarily relying on the considerable charm of its leads to ground its supernatural conceit."
‑ Nick McCarthy, Slant Magazine
"Ms. Mosley, who directed from a screenplay by Tim Macy, struggles to fill her debut feature with a slender notion, but the premise defeats her, even if the story operates at the outset on the pleasure principle."
‑ Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal
"Even The Twilight Zone would have struggled with the cutesy conceit of The Brass Teapot ..."
‑ Nick Schager, Village Voice
"Missing numerous layers of sickness, fearful of pushing a plot of pain on its audience, forcing them to study the complexity of unsavory desires with unlikable characters."
‑ Brian Orndorf, Blu-ray.com
"This dark comedy makes a few smart observations about the lengths people will go to snag the American Dream, but its satiric edge gets dulled rather quickly."
‑ Tim Grierson, Screen International
More reviews for The Brass Teapot on Rotten Tomatoes