The Congress
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In Theaters August 29
More than two decades after catapulting to stardom with The Princess Bride, an aging actress (Robin Wright, playing a version of herself) decides to take her final job: preserving her digital likeness for a future Hollywood. Through a deal brokered by her loyal, longtime agent (Harvey Keitel) and the head of Miramount Studios (Danny Huston), her alias will be controlled by the studio, and will star in any film they want with no restrictions. In return, she receives healthy compensation so she can care for her ailing son and her digitized character will stay forever young. Twenty years later,… More
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 82%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"Ari Folman takes a determined stride into the past with this dizzying, disjointed, always fascinating live action-animation hybrid"
‑ Tom Huddleston, Time Out
"...the sensory overload and thematic bludgeoning of The Congress reach a point of deadening, diminishing returns."
‑ Sean Burns, Movie Mezzanine
"The Congress frequently feels way too ponderous, as though Folman were sure he was saying something important with this film, and didn't want anyone to miss any of it."
‑ Noel Murray, The Dissolve
"As a performance piece, spectacle, drama, comedy, heady sci-fi, and cautionary tale, it's an across the board success."
‑ Jack Giroux, Film School Rejects
"The Congress asks profound questions about performance and identity, especially how the former might distort our perception of the latter, and of reality in general."
‑ Niki Boyle, The List
"Ari Folman is a filmmaker determined to make movies his own way"
‑ Jordan Hoffman, Film.com
"A film so rich in texture, depth of emotion, and subtext that it feels a bit wrong to review it after only a single viewing."
‑ Kristy Puchko, CinemaBlend.com
"One of the most startling uses of the animated medium to come along in years."
‑ Eric Kohn, indieWIRE
"'The Congress' widens the possibilities of filmmaking -- and in doing so, is as pro-cinema as it is anti-Hollywood."
‑ Ryan Lattanzio, Thompson on Hollywood
"We've seen all of the film's elements before, but this combination of them is heady and new."
‑ Eric D. Snider, About.com
"...commits to Big Ideas of identity and integrity with Robin Wright remarkably anchoring it all as, well, herself. (Sort of.)"
‑ William Goss, MSN Movies
"It's hard to believe that I even understood all its themes, because there were many, and this likely exists as an endeavor that needs to be watched on multiple viewings to gauge and comprehend all its profound messages. I'm okay with that."
‑ Clayton Davis, AwardsCircuit.com
"A beautifully drawn curio, The Congress often stacks its industry and tech fears too densely to provide a satisfying film experience or social commentary."
‑ Sam Woolf, We Got This Covered
"...if you're half-distracted all the time, you might be impressed by some of the interesting ideas in this film and be able to ignore what an overall mess it is."
‑ Sarah Boslaugh, Playback:stl
"Folman ... is a master at exploiting diverse animated styles, and draws a brave starring performance from a performer who, in her mid-40s, seems to be just hitting her stride."
‑ Marc Mohan, Oregonian
More reviews for The Congress on Rotten Tomatoes