The Doors
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Val Kilmer delivers what was considered one of 1991's best performances as Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone's hallucinatory bio-pic of the seminal 1960s rock group The Doors. Stone cuts a jagged swath through Morrison's life, starting with a childhood memory where Morrison sees an elderly Indian dying by the roadside. It picks up with Morrison's arrival in California and his assimilation into the Venice Beach culture, followed by his film school days at UCLA; his introduction to his girlfriend Pamela Courson (Meg Ryan); his first encounters with Ray Manzarek (Kyle MacLachlan); and… More
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© Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 54%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"For a while, the obviousness and flat-out vulgarity are sort of entertaining, and it might be possible to enjoy the movie as a camp classic if you could ignore the mean-spiritedness that keeps breaking through."
‑ Terrence Rafferty, New Yorker
"Insidiously funny and remarkably truthful about the psychedelic rock scene in the late 1960."
‑ John Hartl, Seattle Times
"Morrison is played with uncanny authenticity by Val Kilmer. The performance is utterly convincing without being terribly illuminating."
‑ Dennis King, Tulsa World
"The movie is weighed down by its enchantment with the mythology, as opposed to the reality, of Morrison's life -- a mythology that needs to be explored, not simply reproduced on the wide screen."
‑ David Sterritt, Christian Science Monitor
"Stone is not the most subtle of directors, but he has the ability to translate his passion for subject matter (he's an unabashed admirer of Morrison) to the screen with a strong visual flair. That talent in evidence here."
‑ Gary Thompson, Philadelphia Daily News
"Hysteria, however skillfully maintained, should never be mistaken for art -- a caution that applies equally to Stone and his subject."
‑ Dave Kehr, Chicago Tribune
"The whole movie is white hot, lapped in honeyed golds, evilly blue and black or drenched in those swoony, fiery reds. The Doors blasts your ears and scorches your eyes."
‑ Michael Wilmington, Los Angeles Times
"The flaw in the film is its unrelenting tone of bombast. It never gives you a break. You ache for a moment of quietude, an escape from the lizard king's cranium."
‑ Stephen Hunter, Baltimore Sun
"Val Kilmer does, however, pull off a remarkable impression of the troubled vocalist, although he's more convincing on stage than he is in his drunken, drug-fuelled reveries."
‑ David Parkinson, Radio Times
"The attempts to plumb Morrison's sensitive side, his (pretentious) philosophical bent and his struggle to channel his considerable talents positively are something of a blur in the trippy kaleidoscope."
‑ Angie Errigo, Empire Magazine
"While it has its moments, taken by itself, The Doors amounts to little more than an impressionistic look at a boy and his death wish."
‑ Carrie Rickey, Philadelphia Inquirer
"Both a vibrant tribute to rock cult figure Jim Morrison and to the decade in which he flourished."
‑ Gene Siskel, Chicago Tribune
"The much-anticipated film is a psychedelic circus that turns into the worst nightmare of a bad trip. It`s an experience."
‑ Candice Russell, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
"Val Kilmer gives the performance of his career as Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone's biopic, so it's a shame the surrounding film lets him down."
‑ Andrew Lowry, Total Film
"Intense biopic full of drugs, sex and rock'n'roll."
‑ Elliot Panek, Common Sense Media
More reviews for The Doors on Rotten Tomatoes

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