The Hollywood Revue of 1929
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With the arrival of talkies, every major studio hopped on the musical bandwagon by turning out lavish "revues," spotlighting their top stars performing specialty numbers. MGM's entry in this all-star genre was Hollywood Revue of 1929, which, though a box-office smash and a "Best Picture" Oscar nominee, is an absolutely deadly experience when seen today. Even so, it coasts by on its curiosity value, as several major MGM luminaries display their all-talking, all-singing, all-dancing talents (or lack of same). The film is hosted by Conrad Nagel and Jack Benny, the latter… More
Rotten Tomatoes Score: 40%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"No semblance of a story, and considering cast nobody is going to care."
‑ Variety Staff, Variety
"An early sound musical, this plotless revue, emceed by Conrad Nagel and Jack Benny, is a big mishmash with Shearer and Barrymore acting and then spoofing the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet, and Joan Crawford not only dancing but singing too!"
‑ Emanuel Levy, EmanuelLevy.Com
"It is a talking and singing film free from irritating outpourings of coarse slang or a tedious, sobbing romance."
‑ Mordaunt Hall, New York Times
"It's a sometimes fascinating, sometimes tedious historical artifact."
‑ Michael W. Phillips, Jr., Goatdog's Movies
"MGM's entry in the cycle of all-star studio revues that came with the advent of sound; it was by far the most popular, though the waning of some of the celebrities featured makes it seem a little creaky today."
‑ Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader
More reviews for The Hollywood Revue of 1929 on Rotten Tomatoes