The Ister
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In the 1930s and 40s, Martin Heidegger was arguably the world's most important and influential philosopher having won global recognition with this celebrated Being and Time in 1927. Heidegger was also wildly controversial having embraced Nazism in 1933, though he often clashed with the party's leadership. In 1942, Heidegger delivered a series of lectures in which he analyzed at length the poem The Ister, an ode to the Danube River written in the late 18th century by the German author Friedrich Holderlin. Rather than a simple celebration of verse, Heidegger's talks used The Ister as… More
Rotten Tomatoes Score: 88%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"A film about profound ideas deserved more imagination."
‑ John McMurtrie, San Francisco Chronicle
"The headiest, head-scratching-est, damnedest, most demanding movie opening this week in New York."
‑ J. Hoberman, Village Voice
"An impressive philosophical exercise and a meditative work of cinematic beauty."
‑ Jamie Russell, BBC.com
"At over three hours, The Ister is challenging -- and then some. But what's wrong with challenging?"
‑ V.A. Musetto, New York Post
"A very ambitious film that journeys up the Danube from its mouth to it's source('s), noting the history of places, people and thought along its 3,000 kilometer length."
‑ Robert Roten, Laramie Movie Scope
"This uncompromisingly highbrow video essay voyages from the mouth of the Danube to the source, pausing en route for head-spinning detours into thickets of philosophy."
‑ Nathan Lee, New York Times
"Is it fair to say that the language of philosophy is more or less writ in the manner of Final Jeopardy?"
‑ Eric Henderson, Slant Magazine
More reviews for The Ister on Rotten Tomatoes