The Lie
The Lie (2011)

When they first met, Lonnie and Clover were young idealists, but an unplanned baby forced them to flip the script. Lonnie put his music on hold and got a shitty job. And now Clover is abandoning her activism for an "opportunity"… More

Directed By:
Rated: R
Running Time:
Genre: Drama, Comedy
Release Date: March 5, 2012
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Rotten Tomatoes™
Critic Score
74%
Flixster
User Score
50%



Critic Score: 74% Rotten Tomatoes™ Critic Reviews
Lou Lumenick
New York Post

The acting in The Lie -- including a nice bit by Mark Webber as a stoner pal who lectures Leonard on responsibility -- is good enough to almost overlook a so-so ending.

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Scott Tobias
AV Club

The Lie's payoff strikes an unexpected, refreshingly open note that makes this slight little indie more resonant than its scale suggests.

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Shawn Levy
Oregonian

Leonard plays Lonnie with unflattering commitment: you've gotta credit a fellow who plays feckless, selfish and dim so fully.

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Jeannette Catsoulis
New York Times

Comprising small, near-perfect scenes played out largely at dinner tables and on couches, "The Lie" wonders if it's possible to rewrite lives and remake choices.

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Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times

Here's a film in which the actors create plausible people we would probably like. They're loose inside the skins of their characters.

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Brent Simon
Shockya.com

A well acted and uncommonly assured and engaging portrait of post-millennial and particularly male uncertainty.

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Joe Neumaier
New York Daily News

It doesn't try too hard, but what "The Lie" is working at, in its unassuming, amusing way, is a mini-portrait of growing pains in a time of extended adolescence.

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David Fear
Time Out New York

The movie meanders like its dissatisfied, part-time pothead protagonist, not wisely but too well.

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Michelle Orange
Movieline

Embedded in The Lie is a sharp look at the moral limbo of a complacent life, the self-defeat of committing by halves, the self-interest of false equivalencies - but only the shallowest attempts are made to chip its themes out.

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