The Swindle
The Swindle (1997)

The 50th film from legendary French New Wave writer and director Claude Chabrol is a typically Hitchcockian comic thriller about a pair of con artists. Up to now, the duo of Betty (Isabelle Huppert) and Victor (Michel Serrault) have… More

Directed By:
Rated: Unrated
Running Time:
Release Date: August 29, 2006
Add Your Rating
Rotten Tomatoes™
Critic Score
68%
Flixster
User Score
49%


Critic Score: 68% Rotten Tomatoes™ Critic Reviews
Kevin Thomas
Los Angeles Times

A work of superb yet unpretentious film craftsmanship by a past master and an impeccable cast and crew.

Full review…
James Berardinelli
ReelViews

Like The Grifters and Bound, The Swindle succeeds because, in addition to telling an engaging crime story with vivid characters, it never takes itself too seriously.

Full review…
David Cornelius
DVDTalk.com

As a cinematic confection from one of the masters, it's cotton candy, evaporating before it ever gets good.

Full review…
Janet Maslin
New York Times

Even when it threatens to sink into the familiar mechanics of a double-dealing heist story, Chabrol keeps curiosity piqued, the actors delightful and the outcome in sufficient question.

Full review…
Paul Tatara
CNN.com

This is a piece of fluff that dissolves like a sugar cube as you watch it.

Full review…
Christopher Null
Filmcritic.com

unfunny and unthrilling

Full review…
Amy Taubin
Village Voice

A failed attempt at frivolity.

Full review…
Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times

Chabrol's 50th film, made with the practiced ease of a master.

Full review…
Jeremy Heilman
MovieMartyr.com

The Swindle might not be a deep film, but it makes no missteps in showing us the steps these two small time crooks take as they attempt to pull off a big time con.

Full review…
More reviews for The Swindle

Flixster Audience Score: 49% Flixster User Reviews
Pierluigi Puccini
Light, sympathetic mildly twisted, cynic and amusing film from the french master of intrigue Claude Chabrol.
Emily B.
One of the better Chabrol thrillers of the 80s/90s thanks to it's sly humour and performance by Isabelle Huppert.