56 Up
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"Give me the child until he is seven and I will give you the man." Starting in 1964 with Seven Up, The UP Series has explored this Jesuit maxim. The original concept was to interview 14 children from diverse backgrounds from all over England, asking them about their lives and their dreams for the future. Every seven years, renowned director Michael Apted, a researcher for Seven Up, has been back to talk to them, examining the progression of their lives. (c) First Run Features
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Rotten Tomatoes Score: 98%

Critic Reviews from Rotten Tomatoes

"This suffers as well from the fact that the subjects' lives haven't changed all that much since 49 Up (2005); perhaps the series will improve yet as they head into old age."
‑ J. R. Jones, Chicago Reader
"Yes, on some level it's just a seven-year check-in with people maybe half-remembered, if that. Yet the films also serve as a kind of check-in with us, too."
‑ Bill Goodykoontz, Arizona Republic
"As the project hits its half-century mark, with the "kids" settling into middle age, the signature cross-cutting between then, now and everything in between feels downright Proustian in its emotional depth."
‑ Norman Wilner, NOW Toronto
"56 Up has become a stirring reflection, even tribute, to the little bends and turns of ordinariness, the ebbs and surges of everyday lives."
‑ Brian Gibson, Vue Weekly (Edmonton, Canada)
"We might say that '56 Up' serves much the same function as 'Amour,' but it responds to the inevitability of decline with compassion, not dread."
‑ John Beifuss, Commercial Appeal (Memphis, TN)
"The original documentary was intended to illustrate how the country's deeply ingrained class system inscribed itself on the aspirations and inner lives of its young people. But the successive movies have been far less polemical."
‑ Ann Hornaday, Washington Post
"What ultimately is so compelling about 56 Up is the universality of the experiences. We were all once children. And we all will die. And in between, there is everything else."
‑ Steven Rea, Philadelphia Inquirer
"Apted, now 72, has said he'll keep calling on his subjects every seven years until he or they are dead. Whether the subjects show up or not, I for one will be in line when 63 Up comes around."
‑ Sean Means, Salt Lake Tribune
"Apted's subjects would object to the idea that we really know them, but we think we do -- and that's good enough to make his film feel like a reunion, a visit with an old friend. Or 14 of them."
‑ Mike Scott, Times-Picayune
"What started as a crafty way of looking at the U.K.'s rigid class structure has grown into a portrait of melancholy middle age, with its heartbreaks and minor-key triumphs."
‑ Greg Evans, Bloomberg News
"We're now at 56 Up,, and with each passing calendar leap, the experience of watching has only become more soul-stirring."
‑ Lisa Schwarzbaum, Entertainment Weekly
"We feel good, refreshed and depressed in watching these people get older, also embarrassed in moments and cautioned about the passage of time."
‑ Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle
"a window into our shared human experience, and a terrific one at that."
‑ Bill Gibron, Film Racket
"Chances are that you'll come away from this long film feeling a sense of knowing its characters."
‑ Ken Hanke, Mountain Xpress (Asheville, NC)
"Those British kids are now 56"
‑ Robert Denerstein, Movie Habit
More reviews for 56 Up on Rotten Tomatoes