A Mouthful of Air

audience Reviews

, 81% Audience Score
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    For me, it felt like mental illness for beginners, which was probably the aim. The details of her past could have been better explored. Although it shone a light on post partum psychosis, there was more to her lack of mental health than illustrated. There are clues to that within the film. However, it must have had an impact, or I wouldn't have written this!
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    You can feel the sadness, even on the brightest days she sees the world so empty. The depression and anxiety perfectly posed. I highly recommend it
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    This movie reveals just how serious postpartum depression, anxiety is and im glad it is now being bought into the public eye
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    I can relate to the character's depression and anxiety for I too struggle with both. The film & characters feel contrived. While the character's struggles are accurate situations, the extremes on which the husband and her mother walk on eggshells to appease her & her many mood swings and off the wall quirks; such situations would not be catered to for most struggling with depression, which in turn sets an unrealistic tone. Anyone with depression needs those around them not to take aspects lightly, which is a running theme in this film.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    I was recommended this movie by a friend who struggled with PPD. I realized that I had never seen a movie that showed how difficult it was for some mothers to deal with PPD, and how deeply the issue can go. This is a heartfelt and very raw look at how difficult depression is. It is a very important movie about a subject that affects so many. I thought Amanda Seyfried was wonderful. Her character was clearly such a positive person, and her struggle made it all the more challenging because of what everyone expected from her. I had seen some reviewers sarcastic reference to how easy this mother's life was. But I think that's a major point here....I have worked for years with people dealing with depression, and they come in all types. There is no one face of depression. So to boil something down to how someone looks or what their life is like is missing everything. It's an excellent and honest look at a real issue, and the movie sticks with you for a long time.
  • Rating: 0.5 out of 5 stars
    I was disappointed with the movie. I thought it was very vague and rather bland. Yeah. I get the jest behind the movie but this one seemed to drag on a bit. I will not watch it again nor would I recommend it.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    I think this movie, although heartfelt, was predictable. Halfway into the movie, I had a strong feeling on how it would end, and I was correct. I didn't realize at first, the time period was at least two decades in the past. I should have realized with use of home phone and lack of cellulars. I think Seyfried's performance was good. It also tackles anxiety, depression and how traumatic events in one's life can sometimes be buried inside. Breastfeeding mothers can take antidepressants (perhaps not known fact then). This bothered me. I think she could have been helped. I was frustrated that her husband and Psychiatrist knew that she wasn't ok. I don't think she should have been put in the position to be alone with her kids. She was overwhelmed. I liked how they jumped to the present with her husband and adult children. Life goes on….
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Big problems, smartly tackled
  • Rating: 2 out of 5 stars
    Uneventful and slightly interesting movie
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    When art is really, really good - whether it's film, painting, television or theater - it allows us to experience a world that might not be available to us otherwise. A Mouthful of Air is such a film. It's revelatory - and a punch to the gut - in depicting postpartum depression. Amy Koppelman's eye-opening direction frames the experience of Julie (Amanda Seyfried) in tight shots that bring us harrowingly into Julie's world. Seyfried is wonderful. Her progressive dissolution is both subtle and excruciating and seems progressively reflected in her increasingly translucent skin and crystalline eyes. The story moves forward in both linear and non-linear time, which makes the conclusion doubly potent. This isn't an easy film to watch, but when is good art ever easy? I'm going to be thinking about this one for a long time...and am grateful for the experience.