How to Have Sex

audience Reviews

, 65% Audience Score
  • Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Powerful acting and deeply uncomfortable, especially for someone with a young daughter. I imagine these kind of scenarios are terrifiningly common.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Stellar acting, beautiful and uncomfortable coming-of-age film focused on hedonistic culture and what really matters. I cried after the film, because I felt sad for humans in general. It captures the pain and beauty of the human experience.
  • Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    You got to love a movie that is so real. Currently at 65% so I can only assume the other 35% have never experienced or could relate to this type of holiday partying atmosphere. We all wished it went another 20 minutes and ended how we wanted, but this movie was so real!
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Great message, tough watch.
  • Rating: 0.5 out of 5 stars
    Pretty awful. I have to assume all the 5 star ratings must be paid for.
  • Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    "How to Have Sex" is a very unique take on a coming-of-age movie. The movie isn't as focused on being light and funny, despite many vibrant party sequences. I feel like the movie was more designed to feel bleak and uncomfortable, which contrasted with its visual style, and made for a unique watching experience. I think the three leads here genuinely feel like real teenagers, so the movie ends up being effective. I do think it is a slower movie and a lot of time is given just to reflect on intense moments I witnessed. Overall, it is a fascinating movie that raises some good discussions and is also just well-made and engaging.
  • Rating: 0.5 out of 5 stars
    So boring, stopped watching after 40%. Don't trust the rating.
  • Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    How to Have Sex is a long way away from a typical teen romp comedy. Director Molly Manning Walker throws a curveball with this deceptively titled film, instead opting for a raw and unflinching look at female friendship, consent, and the pressures of growing up. Three British teenagers, best friends since childhood, embark on a summer vacation to Greece, fueled by dreams of partying and romantic conquests. However, their idyllic plans take a dark turn, forcing them to confront complex issues that go beyond the awkwardness of teenage flirtation. Walker, drawing inspiration from her own teenage experiences, paints a relatable portrait of female friendships. The bond between the three leads feels genuine, with their playful banter and unspoken understanding ringing true. Mia McKenna-Bruce shines as Tara, the sensitive and introspective centre of the group. However, the exploration of their dynamic falters slightly at times. The supporting characters, particularly Skye (Lara Peake), can feel one-dimensional, their motivations reduced to teenage posturing and insecurity. The film's greatest strength lies in its handling of consent. Walker avoids graphic depictions, instead focusing on the emotional fallout and the lingering sense of violation. A pivotal scene at a nightclub is particularly powerful, using slow-motion camerawork and an unsettling soundscape to capture the confusion and fear Tara experiences. This isn't an after-school special; it's a nuanced exploration of consent that persists long after the credits have ended. Technically, How to Have Sex is a solid effort. The cinematography is naturalistic, with handheld camerawork that reflects the carefree energy of the first half and the claustrophobic tension of the latter. The score is subtle yet effective, using atmospheric sounds and electronic flourishes to underscore the emotional beats. Editing is sharp, keeping the pace brisk without sacrificing character development. While the film doesn't shy away from difficult themes, it's not relentlessly bleak. There are moments of humour and genuine connection, particularly between Tara and Em (Enva Lewis), the voice of reason in the group. This balance between humour and heartbreak is reminiscent of films like The Virgin Suicides or Booksmart, capturing the bittersweet cocktail of teenage emotions. How to Have Sex isn't a perfect film. The characters, while well-acted, could be fleshed out further, and the ending feels a tad ambiguous. However, its unflinching portrayal of consent and its exploration of female friendship resonate deeply. This is a coming-of-age story that feels both authentic and important, a must-watch for anyone who remembers the complexities and anxieties of those teenage years. A thought-provoking and emotionally resonant film for mature teens and adults.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Had no idea what to expect. Brilliant
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Really good movie - rising star award well deserved