Ma

audience Reviews

64% Audience Score64%
  • 3 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconEmpty Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    Perfectly average. I've seen many better films, but I've also seen several worse. It's not bad. It is a strange movie to see with your mother, though!
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconHalf Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    This movie was alright it was weird and some what really crazy movie but i enjoyed it.
  • 3 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconEmpty Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    It was an alright thriller movie. When she's in the liquor store, she pulls the door open when it clearly says to "push." I notice missed edit errors in every movie it seems like.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconHalf Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    Exceeded my expectations, had great characters and actors, but didn't have to much plot. This film is a fun watch but won't go down being remember. Grade: B-
  • 2 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconEmpty Star IconEmpty Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    dont waste your time to watch this movie
  • 2 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconEmpty Star IconEmpty Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    I've just sat and watched the entire 99 minutes of Ma, a low-budget horror thriller starring a three-time Oscar nominee, and I'm genuinely confused who exactly this movie is for. Does it qualify as campy? Is it meant to be campy? Is it meant to have a message? The optics are just all over the place and begging for more context, and you have Octavia Spencer holding court with a movie that teeters into Mommy Dearest territory of bizarre choices. If someone asked me to recommend this movie, I wouldn't know whether it was possible. Not because it's so overtly bad that no human being could find some degree of enjoyment, though make no mistake it's certainly not good, but because I have no idea who to recommend this to. It almost feels like if you're that very small niche that absolutely loves Showgirls, Sleepaway Camp, Falling Down, and Everything Everything. Is that person out there? Does that person exist? Ma (Spencer) is a lonely veterinarian technician in small-town Ohio who is enlisted by a group of teenagers into purchasing them alcohol. She offers up her basement for the kids to get their drink on, free from the law and other prying adults, and it becomes a hangout space for the entire school. Ma starts dressing younger, stalking the kids online and in person, and getting a little too attached to her new friends and the feeling of being young and part of the in-crowd. This is a Crazy Person Movie, which means it falls under the formula of the Crazy Person infiltrating the likes of, presumably, non-crazy individuals, warming to their company, and then eventually going too far and revealing themselves to be dangerous and crazy. As such, there's a natural plot trajectory where the Crazy Person cannot be too off-putting early on. They need to be a little odd, maybe misunderstood, and very vulnerable, enough so that other characters may take pity upon our Crazy Person and invite him or her into their lives. That doesn't work when your Crazy Person is acting crazy and dangerous so early and at every turn. The entire premise hinges on a group of teenagers befriending a 40-soemthing woman who opens up her house for their parties and underage drinking. I have to imagine, even in a small town as the setting, that teenagers have to find other places to go drinking. It can't be that hard. Given the opioid crises, there has to be more than one or two abandoned houses in this neighborhood. Regardless, the first time this older woman invites them over to drink, under the auspices of making sure they're going to be safe with their shenanigans, she literally points a gun at one of them and pretends like she will murder him. Then it's revealed it's not loaded and everyone has a laugh. Now, I don't know about you, dear reader, but if a stranger pulled out a real gun and threatened a friend of mine, that would be our last interaction with that strange stranger. This tenuous grasp on reality makes the movie feel much dumber as it goes, as we keep waiting for what the final tipping point will become for our teenagers to finally conclude that Ma might not be all right. The problem with this is that it makes all of the characters into complete morons, and they're not very well developed beyond stereotypes to begin with. I was struggling to remember the difference between the white guys. The adults aren't much better. Nobody seems to be acting like actual human beings and they're all so boring. This means we're drifting along and either waiting for them to get a clue or get killed, and when it feels like neither is happening any time soon, Ma can become a dreadfully tedious experience that invites further criticism. Tonally, I don't really know what director Tate Taylor (The Help) was going for here as he stepped into unfamiliar genre territory. This was also evident in his film adaptation of The Girl on the Train, which got really confusing and sloppy and potentially campy itself, at least with how self-serious it got to be even when it was twisting corkscrews into necks. When Ma wants to be scary, it's mostly creepy. When Ma wants to be funny (?), it's mostly creepy. When Ma wants to be dramatic, it gets very serious but never follows through, falling back on camp or creeps. Ma has a tragic back-story involving a sexual humiliation, and it just happens that her all-white high school are the cackling faces pointing and laughing at her pain. The flashback scenes of young Ma feel like they were made in the 1960s and not, presumably, the 1980s. She is victimized by the collective white supremacy of her school and the film never deals with the racial aspect. There's a truly weird moment where Ma paints the black male friend's face white, saying there is only room for one of them in the friend group, implying they are token minority positions, I guess. But she literally puts him in white face, and this moment isn't given any more thought. None of the moments relating to race are given any more than passing mention. There's a motherly revelation that, much like the other heavier elements, feels tacked on and never explored in depth, calling into question its very inclusion. There are so many story elements that gets thrown out that it feels like Taylor and his screenwriter are just blindly stumbling through their narrative and hoping that something sticks together. If there is in fact any reason to watch Ma, besides morbid curiosity, it's Spencer (The Shape of Water) who works to find the humanity of an increasingly cartoonish character. Finding out Ma's back-story provides a suitable tragic motivation for her to seek vengeance on the children of her high school tormentors, but there's also the strange element of her attention on Andy, the son of the man she was crushing on in high school. Is she setting him up for some devious end result to get back at his father, or is she trying to get intimate with this kid as a means of tapping into the intimacy with his father that Ma was denied but still obsesses over? She seems to zone out at work often, but is this a general malaise, the idea of a physical or mental sickness that she alludes to, or just her being a poor employee who daydreams about her murder vengeance fantasies? Spencer is bouncing around many different emotional tentpoles and maintains a sense of dignity even when the movie is asking her to behave in cringe-inducing, youth-imitating behavior. I don't know what movie Spencer thought she was acting in from scene-to-scene, but then I don't know if Taylor knew what movie he was directing from scene-to-scene either. Ma is a strange movie for Taylor, Spencer, and every viewer. It's not really a comedy, it's not really a horror movie despite some blood and gore, it's not really a drama because whenever it introduces potent dramatic elements the film abandons them, and it's not really a good movie. It feels like a game experiment that everyone onboard just lost sight of, ultimately losing whatever thread or meaning had appealed to them. Just say no to Ma and yes to Momma. Nate's Grade: C-
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconHalf Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    This was one heck of a ride. Octavia Spencer just steals every scene shes in , now i know why shes become a meme on twitter. Although she does go a bit too far you still feel for her when said twists occur. The teen actors do a great job and Luke Evans shows up and it gets pretty intresting , my only gripe is show us an epilogue stop ending these films so quick !
  • 2 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconEmpty Star IconEmpty Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    Ma had an excellent beginning and the set-up was very good. Movie lost focus and detail and the ending was very mundane.
  • 2.5 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconHalf Star IconEmpty Star IconEmpty Star Icon
    A very bang average movie
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
    Full Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconFull Star IconHalf Star Icon
    Really good! πŸ‘πŸΌπŸ‘πŸΌ