Nostalghia

audience Reviews

, 90% Audience Score
  • Rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars
    The movie is dedicated to the director’s mother, who I assume died from boredom watching her son’s film.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    While it is probably safe to say that the films of Andrei Tarkovsky are not to the tastes of all audiences, it is also clear that Tarkovsky probably understood the language of cinema more than any other director. In Nostalgia, a Russian researcher (Oleg Yanovsky), accompanied by an Italian interpreter (Domiziana Giordano), travels to Italy to research the life of a composer. When he crosses paths with doomsayer Domenico (Erland Josephson), the course of his life is altered. Deeply philosophical, the story does seem a bit obtuse at times, but the visuals throughout are absolutely stunning as Tarkovsky perfectly frames and executes every shot, many of them lasting several minutes, with razor-sharp clarity and creativity. While Nostalgia may not be his finest work, it remains an impressive visual achievement.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Loose chronology, autobiographical elements, dreamlike sequences, thematically dense, slowly paced ... do you think that this Tarkovsky fella has a type? Though not one of the director's more immediately sweeping films (lacking the scale of films such as Stalker or Solaris) and treading on familiar territory stylistically despite being one of his last feature film projects, Nostalghia is still another great work from the acclaimed Soviet (or by this point, de facto ex-Soviet) director. A highly introspective piece, the plot revolves around internal longing and external disconnection - characters recognizing echoes of themselves in those around them but unable to rectify more superficial distinctions. Yankovsky's Andrei is a stranger in a foreign land (much like Tarkovsky himself), seeing familiarity in the emotions that surround him in the Italian countryside but finding only longing for their more familiar equivalents that he has lost access to. And yet, life goes on in all of its strange and miraculous beauty and tragedy, independent of what we perceive our role to be or what emotions we feel. Even among Tarkovsky films, Nostalghia gives off the sensation that it is one of the more languid despite barely passing the two hour mark, largely thanks to its lack of explicit plot, chronological progression, or real conflict. Regardless, it's worth making the effort to make your way through for one of the director's slightly lesser-known but dense and ponderous masterpieces that gives plenty of room for contemplation. (4/5)
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Mistério construído a partir do nada, cheio de reflexões filosóficas e poéticas, beirando o surrealismo.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Incredible, astounding, mind-blowing, poetic, masterful, hypnotic, spellbinding. Words are not enough. This is one of Tarkovsky's masterpieces. Along with "Mirror", it has become my favorite of his movies (and I have now seen them all), followed closely by Ivan's Childhood.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Complex, non-linear and very slow-paced Nostalgia is difficult to swallow even by Tarkovsky standard. The movie deals with the questions of faith, human relationships, the possibility of art language translation and many others. Definitely not the movie to get acquainted with Tarkovsky, but necessary to see if you want to make the full impression of the master's work.
  • Rating: 1 out of 5 stars
    45 minutes is about all I could handle of watching Tarkovsky's remains aimlessly reveling in their own gasses.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    As always an amazing movie by Tarkovsky! The cinematography of the movie is brutal. It's a pleasure for the eye to watch. The woman is very beautiful and reminds of Venera. The plot is very well put and the narratives deeply philosophical. What I liked most about the movie was the poetics, which the director uses -some might even call it mysticism. Recommended for everyone! Tarkovsky is Tarkovsky!
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    One of the best movies I've ever seen.
  • Rating: 0.5 out of 5 stars
    How to make a pretentious and pompous movie: Make everything happen in slow motion. Show people doing weird things (yes sir, water that floor real good, sir). Have the characters name-drop composers, poets, writers, painters, etc. Have the characters lecture the audience. That scene with the man ranting on the horse felt like he picked up a demented homeless dude ranting on a subway train and gave him some screen time to "illuminate us". We should strive to be more together, not further apart. Wow, such wisdom. Fascinating. By the time the candle scene at the end started I was already bored. After enduring that scene, I was pissed off. This was literally the most miserable, enraging, and excruciating experience I have had in a movie theater. Fuck this movie and that weirdo eating bread and looking at himself in the mirror like a maniac.