The Convert

critic Reviews

, 80% Fresh Tomatometer Score
  • , Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Christian ZilkoindieWire
    The Convert manages to combine an entertaining portrayal of an often ignored historical era with universal questions about whether it’s ever possible to build a human society on the foundation of something other than violence.
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  • , Rotten Tomatometer Score
    Frank ScheckHollywood Reporter
    The Convert is uneven and doesn’t fully live up to its thematic ambitions. But it’s handsomely made and thankfully avoids falling victim to white savior syndrome.
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  • , Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Ben KenigsbergNew York Times
    The lush forests and stark, black sand beaches, shot in locations near those used in “The Piano,” help make “The Convert” more than a message movie.
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  • , Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Randy MyersSan Jose Mercury News
    Tamahori's film addresses how New Zealand's indigenous people were mistreated and exploited, but it's also an accomplished character study into the plight of three principles.
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  • , Rotten Tomatometer Score
    Derek SmithSlant Magazine
    All of the time spent on Thomas Munro’s various campaigns for reconciliation and harmony between two Māori tribes hampers the film, which would have been better served had it expounded on the grander conflicts that it only superficially acknowledges.
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  • , Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Stephen RomeiThe Australian
    It starts a little ponderously, as the time and place is set and the characters are fleshed out, but once that haka happens it becomes a gripping historical drama about how faith can be tested in expected and unexpected ways.
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  • , Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Neely SwansonEasy Reader (California)
    There are films that defy expectations and there are those that turn those expectations upside down. Lee Tamahori’s The Convert is a movie that does both.
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  • , Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Hope MaddenThe Screening Room Podcast
    Munro’s arc isn’t frivolous, but neither is it fresh. The emotional pull here is clearly with the Māori, and it’s a shame The Convert is content to make them side players.
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  • , Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Steven ProkopyThird Coast Review
    Pearce’s blend of empathy, steely-eyed determination, and a hint that he’s keeping a secret about his past make him the ideal actor to play Munro
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  • , Fresh Tomatometer Score
    Todd JorgensonCinemalogue
    Guy Pearce’s empathetic performance anchors this visually striking and morally intriguing period drama about faith and colonialism.
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