The Irishman

audience Reviews

86% Audience Score86%
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    It really is a page turner. Oh wait, is there a book? I'm getting it! Love the funny light layer of cream on top and the substantial plot. We are fed this cake so smoothly we don't even realize that we have bought into the plot twist of our own magical historical politique as it goes down. The good guys are the bad guys and the bad guys... well we made them. Just like we made our idols ... political leaders ... gansters. It's a trip.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    One of those epics you have to watch twice.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    To think a mob movie in 2020 using the same traditional mob movie actors would be as fresh and entertaining as its classic counterparts, you'd have to be crazy -- or just have a phenomenal director and cast. The Irishman succeeds in every possible way.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    Pros: Cliché to say, but the performances of De Niro, Pacino and Pesci are just incredible, Class is permanent The more I watched, the more engrossed I became into Frank's life and Jimmy Hoffa's affairs Set design was brilliant also, such as Pennsylvania and Michigan Cons: The runtime was a little issue for me, I thought it could've been cut in some areas, I did become a little bored during parts CGI did bother me slightly Overall - ‘The Irishman' is very good crime film. Scorsese's return to the big screen was a triumphant one. While I don't think it is his best film by any means, it shows why the man is one of the greatest directors ever in my opinion. Like I say Class is permanent Quote - ‘I heard you paint houses' - Jimmy Hoffa Score 8/10
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    A really good mob film with an incredible cast and ending.
  • 1.5 of 5 stars
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    Boring. And trying to make old men into badasses just is more funny than anything. These actors are great and especially in the older godfather movies but now ... it just doesn’t work.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    Crime epic that represents a return to form by all involved. Robert De Niro gives one his best lead performances as Frank Sheeran, a World War II vet who slowly finds himself deep inside the Teamsters Union and the mob, with his story detailing how they became entangled, along with his friendship to Teamsters boss, Jimmy Hoffa (a excellent Al Pacino). The real star is Joe Pesci as Russell Bufalino, the soft spoken mob boss who becomes Frank's friend and mentor. Behind the camera, Martin Scorcese makes one of his best films in years, using the story of Sheeran's rise in the mob as a metaphor for greed and corruption, as they more successful Sheeran becomes, the emptier his soul gets (the final scene is devastating). Whether he is telling the truth about what happened to Hoffa or not doesn't matter, as its more about the corruption a life of crime does to all people. The one downside is the use of de-aging technology to depict the characters throughout the years, but that disappears after a few minutes, as the acting and storytelling takes over. Even its three and a half length isn't imposing (especially if you stream it on Netflix), as this a a true epic, and well worth viewing.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    It would be hard to find a film that had more coverage than Martin Scorsese's latest foray in gangster cinema. a genre that he has shown ''somewhat of an affinity with'' in the past, something that the Oscars have recognized with GOOD FELLAS, THE DEPARTED and GANGS OF NEW YORK. Based on the confessions of mov hitman Frank Sheeran, aka ''The Irishman'', who formed a friendship with Union leader Jimmy Hoffa, who years later disappeared mysteriously. Sporting an insanely good cast, with De Niro as Sheeran, Pacino as Hoffa, and Joe Pesci as mob boss Russell Bufalino. After the quick taste that Michael Mann's HEAT had provided in 1995, and the horrible RIGHTEOUS KILL in 2008, one could wonder if we would ever get to see De Niro and Pacino share the screen once again. Thanks to Netflix' deep pockets, Scorsese was able to assemble that dream cast and tackle this decades spanning saga. THE IRISHMAN isn't as thorough as CASINO or GOOD FELLAS in demonstrating the inner workings of the mob and, in this case, its influence on the Unions run by Jimmy Hoffa. I learned more about that aspect in a 2006 special report featuring Sheeran's ''confession'' and comments from his lawyer and author of the book ''I Heard You Paint Houses: Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa''. It does have the advantage to be based on more recent findings on the case, making it more relevant than Danny De Vito's 1993 HOFFA with Nicholson in the lead. I would have thought that at 209 minutes, it would have had the time to be a bit clearer on that aspect, but it seems Scorsese was more interested in exploring the characters and their relationships than the mechanics of mob-related shenanigans. And with actors like his leads, delving in character development is a gift. In fact the biggest strength and the most obvious weakness of THE IRISHMAN resides in its leads. There is no denying that there is an undeniable pleasure from seeing them work together, and their friendship makes some scenes infinitely more heartbreaking. However, their age (76 for De Niro and 79 for Pacino) makes it difficult, even with the aid of computerized de-aging technology, to make it completely believable that they are, at certain points in the film, at least 30 years younger. Their stance and their overall energy belies their age. It's not a deal-breaker for me, but it made a full immersion in the film difficult. While it doesn't have the vitality of some of his greatest work, feeling much like the film of an older, wiser man than the angry one who made TAXI DRIVER in 1976 or GOOD FELLAS in 1990, THE IRISHMAN remains an important film in Scorsese' career, A film that takes the time not only to explore the actions of its protagonists, but also to linger on the consequences of their actions on them, their family and their regrets. A younger man wouldn't have made that movie.
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    Martin Scorsese teams up with Netflix to deliver the captivating crime drama The Irishman. Based on a supposed "true crime" novel, the film follows a teamster named Frank Sheeran who becomes a mob enforcer and goes to work for Jimmy Hoffa. Starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Joe Pesci, and Harvey Keitel, the cast is especially strong and gives solid performances. Additionally, the de-aging CGI is pretty effective, allowing the actors to play a variety of ages; though there are times where their movements betray their real ages. The sets and costumes are also well-done, giving an authentic feel for the time-periods. However, the film is about an hour too long; including a lot of unnecessary and superfluous scenes. Yet despite a few weaknesses, The Irishman is a compelling film about the toll a life of crime takes.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    No matter how long the time passes, Martin Scorsese will never lose his touch. It was also amazing to see Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci in a movie together with Martin Scorsese.