The Worst Person in the World

audience Reviews

, 86% Audience Score
  • Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    This was good for me. Many moments portrayed have an authentic human feel with believable human reactions. I didn't appreciate some "wokeness" in the plot, but that's to be expected these days. Nonetheless, this was well worth watching for the .99 cents I spent on iTunes to rent it.
  • Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    I really enjoyed this movie. I found myself becoming very involved in the dialogue and the central characters and felt protective of them all. The scenes with her father altho predictable were also very compelling.
  • Rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars
    Referred by Norwegian director Joachim Trier as a rom-com for people who hate rom-coms, this festival circuit darling laments with freewheeling hipness the commitment issues of the millennial crisis through a "coming-of-age" story of a despicably undecided and unfaithful heroine stumbling over romantic and career endeavours.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    I was really looking forward to this film, and I thought I would like it a lot more than I did. It was interesting enough, and I would have kept watching, but I had a lot of other films at my disposal as I was sitting on an airplane. As it was, I watched the introduction and first three chapters, and I found it interesting enough that I may go back and finish it at some point.
  • Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Text: This Norwegian film, The Worst Person in the World, is a romantic comedy that portrays the shattering of human minds, especially in the 20s or 30s of years youths. The protagonist of the movie Julie wants to experience life in her own way but is restricted by some of the personal liabilities in her life. Her mind is getting changed according to her perception of life. She fell in love with many people and as well as she shares a bed with them but for a short span of time she just attracted to a Comic book writer Aksel and they lead a living together life. But at some point, she was just attracted to another man and avoids Aksal but at that time Aksal was so much fond of her and it looks very disappointed for him to leave her. But that relationship with Julie (with Eivind) doesn't was a steady one which also leads to a collapse. So in this sense, the conclusion of the movie relies on the continuing journey of Julie to the next level of her life. She is not affected by the failure in her life because she believes that it all happened to her only because of her own decisions. At the early stage, she always thought about her perspective of life that surrounded her, and that's why she points out that "I feel like a spectator in my own life". She wants to rid of that spectatorship from her life. Is she successful, is the question that remarks the entirety of the movie. Summary: Success or failure; the question for Julie
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    This fantastic film speaks honestly about intimate relationships, full of imperfection, deep knowingness, and pain, feelings that are familiar to anyone who has been through a break-up. We journey through life with Julie, a captivating, creative, sometimes selfish but ultimately likeable lead who oscillates constantly between searching and settling. Joachim Trier is skilled at bringing us along for this ride though her internal and external worlds with the help of playful storytelling devices; in one scene, we are treated to a visceral magic mushroom-fuelled Freudian journey through the psyche. In another, time literally stops as the unfolding of a new relationship eclipses all else. In these moments we see inside Julie's mind; Trier wants us to understand his characters and even in moments of sudden upheaval, we understand their motives. The characters are given self-awareness and intelligence, which is part of what makes the film's conflicts so compelling to watch. In one of the most heartbreaking scenes, Julie tells her lover, "I love you and I don't love you" and we are there with her, experiencing her conflict, contradictory but decisive. Humour has a place in the film, too, but to great relief it is never used to break tension; difficult emotions are given time and space to be processed. We are also invited us to think about intergenerational trauma, feminism, ‘wokeness', nostalgia and psychoanalysis, if we want to (these occur through casual dinner party conversations, off-handed comments and a matter-of-fact narrator). We certainly come away from the film with more than we bargained for. We remember that life is messy, unpredictable and wonderful.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Slightly too slow but with great topics ! not presumptuous in its filming, simple, efficient
  • Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Destinato a diventare uno dei film norvegesi più visti e conosciuti al mondo; grazie soprattutto alla visibilità data dalle candidature agli Oscar 22. La trama è senza dubbio originale, introspettiva e totalizzante nel racconto della sua protagonista, di cui si conoscono tutti gli aspetti caratteriali e di cui si comprendono le scelte (pure quelle sbagliate), che vengono perfettamente ricondotte all'infanzia, al rapporto con il padre e agli amori. La suddivisione in numerosi capitoli aiuta a seguire lo sviluppo della storia ed è impossibile per chi guarda, non ritrovarsi in almeno alcuni di questi passaggi. Il titolo diventa quasi una satira del comportamento umano di una persona alla sola ricerca del suo benessere.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Always give praise to films that have refreshingly imperfect protagonists. The Worst Person in the World may not be earth-shattering in scope, but it's a testament to the authenticity of the drama that the film can be so impactful with so few characters. This Joachim Trier project is particularly hard-hitting given the naturalistic and empathetic development of its conflict, with Renate Reinsve's Julie exhibiting relatable insecurities and uncertainty, which in turn fuels major life-changing events with lasting and profound implications for both herself and those around her. Then there's the film's depiction of love, simultaneously subject to human frailty and potentially resilient beyond measure. Taken together, it's an interesting and potentially devastating taste of life's unpredictability, of connections made and lost through circumstances both beyond and within our control. Even though throwing in a character with a sudden and unexpected terminal disease feels a bit like cheating, there's a core to this film that feels honest and real. Solid direction and very good acting, I only wish the trailer didn't spoil the 'frozen time' sequence. (4/5)
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    The chronicles of four years in the life of Julie (Renate Reinsve), a young woman who navigates the troubled waters of her love life and struggles to find her career path, leading her to take a realistic look at who she really is... Rotten Tomatoes consensus reads, "The Worst Person in the World concludes Joachim Trier's Oslo Trilogy with a romantic comedy that delightfully subverts the genre's well-worn tropes." The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw described the film as "one of Cannes' best" and "an instant classic". Richard Lawson of Vanity Fair called it "exquisite, wistful (and downright sad)", praising the cast performances and Trier's writing. In his review for IndieWire, David Ehrlich gave the film a grade of B and commended Reinsve's performance, stating "If Julie is less of a character than a vividly realized archetype, Reinsve didn't get the message." Vanity Fair and The Atlantic declared The Worst Person in the World to be the best film of 2021. This is Joachim Trier´s third film in his "Oslo Trilogy", following "Reprise" (2006) and "Oslo, August 31st" (2011). The film premiered in competition at the 2021 Cannes Film Festival to widespread critical acclaim, with Renate Reinsve winning the award for Best Actress for her performance in the film. At the 94th Academy Awards, the film was nominated for Best International Feature Film and Best Original Screenplay. (via Wikipedia) The film has a prologue, 12 chapters and a epilogue. As a fan of Joachim Trier´s "Reprise" and specifically "Oslo, August 31st" I was glad to see that he finally was closing the "Oslo Trilogy" with "The Worst Person in the World" and reading about all the accolades and praise I was really looking forward to see it. First of all, the acting is of a very high standard and Renate Reinsve gives us a splendid performance. And Anders Danielsen Lie is great as always. The story is hardly unique and I personally thought that the film is a bit scattered with all the chapters that creates an unbalance. Maybe that was Trier´s aim as Julie´s life is scattered. However, that is an issue to my mind since the flow becomes broken. I think as well that that the film is a bit flatlined, there´s no emotional punch like in "Oslo, August 31st" which I miss at least. I can relate to Julie in certain of her actions, but is she likeable? Not really, which makes you less engaged. And that goes for Aksel as well. I had high hopes and they were not fully met. It´s a solid film, but not Trier´s best in my book.