Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)

In this film, married couple George and Martha know just how to push each other's buttons. Tiring of attacking each other, George and Martha invite newcomers to join in the invective. After an evening of sadistic "fun and… More

Directed By:
Rated: R
Running Time:
Release Date: June 22, 1966
DVD Release Date: May 18, 1999
Add Your Rating
Rotten Tomatoes™
Critic Score
95%
Flixster
User Score
91%

Also Available On



Critic Score: 95% Rotten Tomatoes™ Critic Reviews

Consensus: Led by a volcanic performance from Elizabeth Taylor, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a scathing adaptation of the Edward Albee play that serves as a brilliant calling card for debuting director Mike Nichols.

Kate Cameron
New York Daily News

[Taylor] is nothing less than brilliant as the shrewish, slovenly. blasphemous, frustrated, slightly wacky, alcoholic wife of a meek, unambitious assistant professor of history at a university, over which her father reigns as president.

Full review…
Dave Kehr
Chicago Reader

When Nichols finally settles down, it's almost too late.

Full review…
Josh Larsen
LarsenOnFilm

I could watch Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton do this for hours.

Full review…
Andrew Sarris
Village Voice

Nichols has actually committed all the classic errors of the sophisticated stage director let loose on the unsophisticated movies. For starters, he has underestimated the power of the spoken word in his search for visual pyrotechnics.

Full review…
Geoff Andrew
Time Out

Edward Albee's vitriolic stage portrayal of domestic blisslessness translated grainily and effectively to the screen.

Full review…
Matt Brunson
Creative Loafing

It's one of the Academy's black marks that Burton didn't win the Best Actor Oscar for his remarkable, career-capping performance.

Full review…
James Powers
Hollywood Reporter

The greatest credit for the implacable engagement that the film creates for its audience must go to the director, Mike Nichols. Nichols makes a stunning film bow with Virginia Woolf.

Full review…
Stanley Kauffmann
New York Times

One of the most scathingly honest American films ever made.

Sarah Boslaugh
PopMatters

[Haskell Wexler's] camera work is highly expressive, using odd angles, unusual close-ups, and handheld shots to mirror the out-of-kilter nature of the characters' worlds.

Full review…

Flixster Audience Score: 91% Flixster User Reviews
Bob Stinson
mthebee haven't seen 4 ever
Kevin Cookman
The vitriolic honesty of the impeccable source material when paired with a quartet of the finest performances in film history make for a work of legends.....… More
Spencer S.
Edward Albee's words are magnificent for the silver screen, but it is the performances from Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton that truly bring the… More
paul oh
Extremely heartbreaking and hard to watch. Its a film of human emotions flying out with alcohol. The whole cast (4 people) were all nominated for an Oscar and… More
Matthew Samuel Mirliani
This film is a must-see simply because it is a classic, it is expertly written, and Elizabeth Taylor is absolutely mesmerizing. However, while the beginning of… More
Chris Weber
Mike Nichols made his directorial debut with this adaptation of Edward Albee's play about a delusional, dysfunctional middle-aged couple who invite a young… More